TOP-10 MUSEUMS IN BERLIN WITH THE MOST INTERESTING COLLECTIONS

TOP-10 Museums In Berlin With The Most Interesting Collections

Berlin has won the international reputation of the city of museums. Even those who consider a visit to the museum boring, they will still find something interesting here. The capital of Germany has 175 museums and about 300 private collections. Hardly anyone can boast of having visited them all, but there are 10, without a visit to which an acquaintance with Berlin cannot be considered full.

We picked up the top expositions in the German capital, which are as much an integral part of Berlin as the famous wall and the Brandenburg Gate!

 

Berlin Museum Pass

Let’s start with how to save money and do not waste time waiting. If you plan to actively attend museums, Berlin Museum Pass may be useful. With the Berlin Museum Pass, you can visit 50 museums in 3 days for € 29.00 (reduced price € 12.00) with a brochure to navigate Berlin’s diverse museum scene.

Berlin Museum Pass includes the following:

– free entrance to 50 of Berlin’s best museums including the most expensive – the Pergamon, Checkpoint Charlie Museum, Altes Museum, Bode Museum and more;

– free admission to 9 attractions including Madame Tussauds, the Berlin Dungeon, Legoland, the Berliner Dom, AquaDom & Sea Life Berlin and others;

– free tours a 24-hour open-top bus, a bike tour, walking tour, a Segway tour and river cruise

– a free 95-page guidebook (available in English, German & Italian)

You can buy the Museum Pass Berlin online.

Please visit for more detailed information and current prices for different types of Berlin cards and passes.

Important: If you have an international student ID card, take it with you. Using a student card, you can get some discounts, ranging from visiting sights, museums, cinemas to accommodation in hostels and train tickets.

 

Related: Tips on How Not to Spend a lot of Money during Your Visit to Berlin and Munich

 

Now let’s start our top-10 list of Berlin museums with the most interesting expositions.

 

  1. Charlottenburg (Schloss Charlottenburg)

This Baroque palace was built in 1695-1699 by order of King Frederick I for his wife Sophia Charlotte.

Walking through the palace, you will see the private rooms of the king and the queen, the library and other rooms that will amaze your imagination with their beauty. Luxurious chandeliers, crystal and porcelain tableware, mirrors of different shapes and sizes, perfectly preserved furniture of that era – all demonstrate the high status and excellent taste of the owners.

 

Charlottenburg-Berlin

 

Walking through the palace, you will see the private rooms of the king and the queen, the library and other rooms that will amaze your imagination with their beauty. Luxurious chandeliers, crystal and porcelain tableware, mirrors of different shapes and sizes, perfectly preserved furniture of that era – all demonstrate the high status and excellent taste of the owners.

There is a burial chamber in Charlottenburg, where the Queen Louise of Prussia, her husband Friedrich Wilhelm III and other members of the royal family are buried.

Having a single ticket “Charlottenburg +”, valid for one day, you can visit the Old Palace, the Schinkel Pavilion, the New Wing, the Belvedere Tea Palace and other buildings that make up the complex

The most famous exhibits are the crown used during the coronation of the first Prussian king, the snuff-box of Frederick the Great, decorated with precious stones, and a collection of utensils made of precious metals.

Address: Spandauer Damm 10-22.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 10:00 to 17:00 (18:00).

Ticket price: € 10-12. Free with Berlin Museum Pass. The park can be visited free of charge.

 

  1. Old Museum (Altes Museum)

Old Museum was built on the Museum Island in 1822-1830 for the storage of a collection belonging to the Prussian royal family. During the Great Patriotic War, it was damaged, but in 1966 it was restored and reopened for visitors.

Here the works of classical antique art are stored. You can find statues, vases, and weapons by Greek and Roman masters.

 

Altes Museum

 

The most famous exhibits are Caesar’s busts (“Green Caesar”), Cleopatra and Caracalla.

Address: Am Lustgarten.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 10; free admission with Berlin Museum Pass. All the exposition of the Museum Island can be visited for € 18.

 

Related: Travel from Prague to Berlin

 

  1. New Museum (Neues Museum)

It was built in 1843-1855 for the storage of exhibits, which did not have enough space in the Old Museum. During the Great Patriotic War, the building was badly damaged, for decades it was ranked as “the most beautiful ruins of Berlin, and only in 1986, the restoration work was started there. The museum was again opened for visitors in 2009, and in 2014 it was granted the status of a monument of engineering and architectural art.

 

Neues Museum

 

It includes several expositions:

  • Egyptian Museum. Here you can see items related to the ancient Egyptian and Nubian cultures: statuettes, sarcophagi, priestly clothes, a pyramid model, copies of wooden boats, a valuable collection of papyrus and, of course, the famous bust of Nefertiti, which the Egyptian government still tries to return, but unsuccessfully.

 

  • Museum of prehistoric period and early history, where the busts of ancient Roman philosophers, Cro-Magnon and Neanderthals tools and household utensils, musical instruments, coins and other interesting exhibits from different eras are stored.

 

  • The Ethnographic Museum, which presents archaeological finds from different parts of Germany. The most valuable of them is the Golden Hat of 1000-800 BC, presumably belonging to a priest. This exhibit has a dark past, as it got to the museum from the underground antiquities market.

The most famous exhibits are the bust of Nefertiti, discovered in 1912 during the excavation of the city of Ahetaton, and the Golden Hat found in Swabia in the early 90s of the last century.

Address: Bodestraße 1-3.

Working hours: daily from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 14, free admission with Berlin Museum Pass. All the exposition of the Museum Island can be visited for € 18.

 

  1. Pergamon Museum

Built on the Museum Island in 1910-1930, Pergamon Museum was intended for the storage of the Pergamon altar, one of the most famous monuments of the Hellenistic period, preserved to this day.

Pergamon Museum

 

Now the museum includes the following:

  • The Antiquity Collection, including the Pergamon altar (180-160 BC), the gate of the Miletus market (100 AD), as well as works of art from ancient Greek and Roman periods: sculptures, mosaics, ornaments.

 

  • Museum of Islamic Art, which features miniatures, ivory items, carpets and other valuable things created in the VIII-XIX centuries. Pearls of the collection are a frieze from the Mshatta Palace in Jordan, a dome from the Alhambra (Granada, Spain), mihrabs from Kashan (Iran) and Konya (Turkey), Aleppo room.

 

  • The Middle East Museum is a collection of archaeological finds related to the Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian cultures. Here the Babylonian Ishtar Gate is kept, and Ishtar procession path is

The most famous exhibits are the Pergamon altar, the gate of the Miletus market and the Babylonian gate Ishtar.

Address: Bodestraße 1-3.

Working hours: daily from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 12; for the owners of Berlin Museum Pass admission is free. All the exposition of the Museum Island can be visited for € 18.

 

  1. Technical Museum (Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin)

It is one of the largest museums of such kind in Europe, which since 1983 works in the building of the former railway depot. Its roof is decorated with the Douglas C-47 Skytrain, called “Raisin Bomber”. Such aircrafts supplied the inhabitants of West Berlin with food during the blockade of 1948-1949. Some pilots dropped sweets for children, and among other things there were raisins, hence it received its unofficial name.

 

National Technical Museum

 

The museum has 14 thematic expositions devoted to photography, cinema, chemistry and pharmaceutics, brewing and other industries. One of the most visited exhibitions tells about Konrad Zuse, a German civil engineer who in 1941 created the first programmable computer, and in 1948, the first high-level programming language (“Plankalkul”).

The experimental center “Spectrum” operates at the museum, where you can, for example, call a tornado or lightning with your own hands. It will be interesting both for adults and children.

The most famous exhibits are the “Raisin Bomber” Douglas C-47 Skytrain and a model of the computing device Z1.

Address: Trebbiner Straße 9, D-10963 Berlin-Kreuzberg.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 9:00 (10:00) to 17:30 (18:00).

Ticket price: € 8, for the owners of Museum Pass Berlin admission, is free.

 

  1. Museum of Natural History (Museum für Naturkunde)

It’s one of the largest museums in the country, which houses 30 million exhibits. There are minerals (65% of all studied to date, only about 200,000 copies), skeletons of dinosaurs, including the largest in the world fossils with imprints of prehistoric creatures, masterfully executed dummies of mammoths and other animals, a collection of insects, and other. The day spent in this museum will replace the children dozens of school lessons and help adults to fill the gaps in knowledge!

 

Museum of Natural History

 

The most famous exhibit is the world’s largest restored dinosaur skeleton.

Address: Invalidenstraße 43.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 9:30 (10:00) to 18:00.

Ticket price: € 8; for the owners of Berlin Museum Pass admission is free.

 

  1. Berlin Picture Gallery (Berliner Gemäldegalerie)

Berlin Picture Gallery is one of the most famous art museums in Europe, which houses a collection of paintings from the XIII-XVIII centuries. Here you can find the works of Titian, Caravaggio, Bosch, Brueghel, Rubens, Durer and other recognized masters. The pride of the gallery is one of the world’s largest collections of Rembrandt’s works, 16 canvases.

 

Berlin Picture Gallery

 

The most famous exhibits are paintings by Rembrandt.

Address: Matthäikirchplatz 4/6.

Working hours: Daily except for  Monday from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 10-12; for the owners of Berlin Museum Pass admission is free.

 

  1. The Bode Museum

Being located on the Museum Island in the period from 1897 to 1904, it survived a major restoration in 2000-2006.

The Bode Museum holds one of the largest collections in Germany, which, after the end of the Great Patriotic War, was divided between the Western and Eastern parts of the country and reassembled only in 2006.

 

Bode Museum

 

In the Museum of Byzantine Art, you can see the works of Roman and Byzantine art of the III-XV centuries: sarcophagi, sculptures, ivory, icons, mosaics, religious objects.

The coin collection is one of the largest numismatic collections in Germany, holding 4000 exhibits of 500,000. Other 1,500 antique coins are kept in the Pergamon Museum.

The most famous exhibits are Donatello’s works and the sculpture “The Triumph of the Cross” from St. Moritz Church in Naumburg, parts of which were divided and stored in the territory of West and East Germany for several decades.

Address: Am Kupfergraben.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 10; free admission for the owners of Berlin Museum Pass. All the exposition of the Museum Island can be visited for € 18.

 

  1. Old National Gallery (Alte Nationalgalerie)

Old National Gallery was built on the Museum Island in 1869-1876, according to the sketch of King Frederick William IV. A collection of works of art of the XIX century is presented here. There are works of novelists, impressionists (for example, Eduard Manet and Claude Monet), modernists. The gallery boasts one of the finest and most comprehensive collections of its kind, with artwork ranging in date of composition from the French Revolution to World War I and representing the period’s major contributions, from Classicism to Wiener Sezession.

 

Old National Gallery

 

The Old National Gallery contains three floors of exhibition space, where work is displayed according to themes organized by particular artistic movements, styles, or schools. Significant exhibits include the Goethe era, represented by artists such as Jakob Philipp Hackert, Wilhelm Schadow, and Anton Graff.

Examples of Romantic art include a number of paintings by the German master Caspar David Friedrich, as well as portraits by Philipp Otto Runge. The gallery’s collection of Impressionist paintings includes the work of Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, and Paul Cézanne. Among the sculptures displayed are pieces by Auguste Rodin and Johann Gottfried Schadow.

Address: Bodestraße 1-3.

Working hours: Daily except for Monday from 10:00 to 18:00 (20:00).

Ticket price: € 10; for the owners of Berlin Museum Pass admission is free. All the exposition of the Museum Island can be visited for € 18.

 

  1. The Stasi Museum (Stasimuseum)

It is located in the former headquarters of the Ministry of State Security of the GDR (Ministerium für Staatssicherheit), which was unofficially called the Stasi.  Have you watched the movie “The Life of Others”, which in 2007 received the Oscar? Some of his scenes were shot in this building.

It will appeal to those who love spy stories and want to understand what allowed the GDR secret police to be one of the strongest in the world. Visitors will see a room with a telephone wiretap, prison cells, an isolator and even torture aids.

 

The Stasi Museum

 

Among the exhibits, there are “bugs”, equipment for photo, video and audio fixation, fake identity cards, and other tools found in the basement of the building. There is also a vehicle for covert surveillance, disguised as a van for delivering food.

The most famous exhibits are spy devices for photo and video shooting and equipment for wiretapping.

Address: Ruschestraße 103, Haus 1.

Working hours: daily from 10:00 (11:00) to 18:00. Excursions in English are held on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday at 15:00, and you can also book a private tour at another time for a fee.

Ticket price: € 6.

 

Related: 24 Little-Known Facts About Berlin for the Travelers

 

Conclusion

Berlin has often been called the cultural capital of Europe. The city boasts an impressive directory of museums that span and pay tribute to everything from natural and human history, to housing world-renowned artworks and dazzling displays of German design.

There are many more museums in Berlin for every taste: from the Berlin Wall Memorial and DDR Museum to Topography of Terror Museum, which is not for the fainthearted history-lovers, as well as from the intimate collections of Museum Berggruen to Currywurst Museum, which uncovers the story of fast food through the ages.

I hope our list of the most interesting museums will be useful to you during your visit to Berlin.

Have a nice holiday!

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